Motion Detectors with Pets

Important things to keep in mind.

BY LINLEY STRINGER

January 15, 2021

2020-11-11 blog-images 22

You want motion detectors, but you’re worried your pets will set off the detectors constantly. What can you do when your cats keep setting your motion detectors off? This is a problem with a lot of traditional motion detectors, but there are some new and improved motion detectors that can be calibrated appropriately for pets. It may just take a little additional work.

Pet-immune motion detectors

Pet-immune motion detectors are designed to prevent false alarms set off by active pets. These detectors are set to ignore the motion of animals based on their size, from small, 15-pound cats, to large, 80-pound dogs. Often, homeowners with pets don’t set their home’s security system, fearing their pet will activate too many false alarms, which could result in hefty fines or being placed on a “do not respond” list by authorities.

How do sensors work with pets?

There are different types of sensors. Some sensors send out waves at intervals to detect motion, and if they do detect motion, they will sound an alarm. Many of these systems won’t catch a cat or a small dog because they are looking for large objects at timed intervals. But these types of alarms commonly come with some drawbacks, such as giving out false alarms if something in the room moves.

Other sensors sense heat, in which case a large dog may appear to them as a person. These systems can be designed not to sense things that are smaller than the average human.

In general, the smaller the animal and the more erratic its movements, the easier it is for a system to ignore. Pet owners who have cats will usually find it easier to find an acceptable sensor system than people who have very large dogs.

A few other tips for preventing motion sensor false alarms with pets:

  • Closing off rooms that the animals don’t need and putting motion detectors in those rooms.

  • Putting sensors and high visibility security cameras outside of your home.

  • Installing sensors at doorways, windows, and other entryways.

For more information about the best home security options for you and your home, call us today at Brinks Home Security®.

Linley Stringer is a copywriter for Brinks Home Security. She is passionate about telling stories that keep consumers informed and protected.

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Motion Detectors with Pets

Important things to keep in mind.

BY LINLEY STRINGER

January 15, 2021

You want motion detectors, but you’re worried your pets will set off the detectors constantly. What can you do when your cats keep setting your motion detectors off? This is a problem with a lot of traditional motion detectors, but there are some new and improved motion detectors that can be calibrated appropriately for pets. It may just take a little additional work.

Pet-immune motion detectors

Pet-immune motion detectors are designed to prevent false alarms set off by active pets. These detectors are set to ignore the motion of animals based on their size, from small, 15-pound cats, to large, 80-pound dogs. Often, homeowners with pets don’t set their home’s security system, fearing their pet will activate too many false alarms, which could result in hefty fines or being placed on a “do not respond” list by authorities.

How do sensors work with pets?

There are different types of sensors. Some sensors send out waves at intervals to detect motion, and if they do detect motion, they will sound an alarm. Many of these systems won’t catch a cat or a small dog because they are looking for large objects at timed intervals. But these types of alarms commonly come with some drawbacks, such as giving out false alarms if something in the room moves.

Other sensors sense heat, in which case a large dog may appear to them as a person. These systems can be designed not to sense things that are smaller than the average human.

In general, the smaller the animal and the more erratic its movements, the easier it is for a system to ignore. Pet owners who have cats will usually find it easier to find an acceptable sensor system than people who have very large dogs.

A few other tips for preventing motion sensor false alarms with pets:

  • Closing off rooms that the animals don’t need and putting motion detectors in those rooms.

  • Putting sensors and high visibility security cameras outside of your home.

  • Installing sensors at doorways, windows, and other entryways.

For more information about the best home security options for you and your home, call us today at Brinks Home Security®.

Linley Stringer is a copywriter for Brinks Home Security. She is passionate about telling stories that keep consumers informed and protected.


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