Where to Place a Freeze Sensor

Three tips for accurate placement.

BY LINLEY STRINGER

January 4, 2021

2020-11-11 blog-images 7

Home security systems are much more than a set of alarms. Many integrate smoke detectors, motion sensors, and thermostats. One important add-on to consider for your system is a freeze sensor. Designed to protect your home from pipes bursting during the cold winter months, freeze sensors gauge the temperature of your home, alerting you when it drops below a safe temperature. Here are a few tips when it comes to placing your freeze sensor.

Put the freeze sensor in places where low temperatures could cause problems

Extreme cold temperatures can be dangerous for a home, causing pipes to freeze and burst, resulting in flooding. Placing a freezer sensor in “danger zones” is a good step towards preventing pipes bursting. An alarm and notification will go off and let the homeowner know that temperatures are getting too cold, giving the homeowner a heads up when action needs to be taken.

Don’t put the freeze sensor in drafty places

If the homeowner places a freeze sensor by a door or window, a stiff breeze can cause the alarm to go off. It’s a good practice to keep them away from places a breeze can get in easily. Putting a sensor near the door and window could end up burning out the battery in the long run, as well as alerting the homeowner unnecessarily.

Put the freeze sensor in vacation homes and other low maintenance places

Own a vacation property and want to keep it dry during the autumn and winter? A freeze sensor can be the answer to that question. Just before the vacation is over, stick two or three freeze sensors near or in the basement or places where there are pipes in the home If the sensor detects cold temperatures, many of them can send an alert to the homeowner’s phone or security company, giving all involved parties the opportunity to quickly deal with the cold temperatures.

For more information about home security and finding devices that will work for you, call Brinks Home Security® today.

Linley Stringer is a copywriter for Brinks Home Security. She is passionate about telling stories that keep consumers informed and protected.

water-leak-detection desktop

Water Leak Detection

Read more
1 8 bypass-a-garage-door-sensor Desktop

Can You Bypass a Garage Door Sensor? Things to Keep in Mind

Read more
2020-11-11 blog-images 25

Windows Sensors for Double Hung WIndows

Read more
Share via:

Where to Place a Freeze Sensor

Three tips for accurate placement.

BY LINLEY STRINGER

January 4, 2021

Home security systems are much more than a set of alarms. Many integrate smoke detectors, motion sensors, and thermostats. One important add-on to consider for your system is a freeze sensor. Designed to protect your home from pipes bursting during the cold winter months, freeze sensors gauge the temperature of your home, alerting you when it drops below a safe temperature. Here are a few tips when it comes to placing your freeze sensor.

Put the freeze sensor in places where low temperatures could cause problems

Extreme cold temperatures can be dangerous for a home, causing pipes to freeze and burst, resulting in flooding. Placing a freezer sensor in “danger zones” is a good step towards preventing pipes bursting. An alarm and notification will go off and let the homeowner know that temperatures are getting too cold, giving the homeowner a heads up when action needs to be taken.

Don’t put the freeze sensor in drafty places

If the homeowner places a freeze sensor by a door or window, a stiff breeze can cause the alarm to go off. It’s a good practice to keep them away from places a breeze can get in easily. Putting a sensor near the door and window could end up burning out the battery in the long run, as well as alerting the homeowner unnecessarily.

Put the freeze sensor in vacation homes and other low maintenance places

Own a vacation property and want to keep it dry during the autumn and winter? A freeze sensor can be the answer to that question. Just before the vacation is over, stick two or three freeze sensors near or in the basement or places where there are pipes in the home If the sensor detects cold temperatures, many of them can send an alert to the homeowner’s phone or security company, giving all involved parties the opportunity to quickly deal with the cold temperatures.

For more information about home security and finding devices that will work for you, call Brinks Home Security® today.

Linley Stringer is a copywriter for Brinks Home Security. She is passionate about telling stories that keep consumers informed and protected.


Chat