Home Security Cameras

Where to place them.

BY JASON STEVENS

November 5, 2020

6 Where to Place Home Security Cameras1

When it comes to creating a whole-home security system, security camera placement is crucial. But before installation, you will want to plan for a full-coverage approach that covers all entry points into your home, a variety of angles, and heights.

Use this home security camera placement guide to ensure the best coverage for your home and property.

Plan with a home security camera placement diagram

Keep in mind that although security cameras are a powerful tool in your home security arsenal, they are simply one piece of your security strategy. When planning, work with your senior security consultant to create a diagram of your home. Make sure you consider the following:

What the cameras cover

  • All points of entry

  • Hallways and pathways

  • Outdoor spaces

Property size

A property is safest when it is properly equipped to deal with every important angle. When you create your home’s security diagram, look for any areas that aren’t covered.

Power sources for your security cameras

Are your indoor and outdoor security cameras going to be installed in an area where a power source is local? Is internal power necessary? If your cameras have batteries, can you easily access those cameras to change out batteries as needed? While power source proximity is crucial, make sure you’re also ensuring the best view.

Camera sensor and video quality

It’s important to consider camera quality when choosing your home security solution. Look for options with infrared sensors, night vision, and high-definition video capabilities.

Indoor security camera placement

While you might envision burglars using stealthy means to access a home, statistics show many break-ins occur through the front door. A camera right inside your front entry or living room is your first line of defense when it comes to protection. Here are a few other areas to place indoor security cameras:

Inside front and back doors

Given these are commonly used entry points, angle your cameras to catch anyone entering or exiting through these main areas. Ensure the camera has a wide angle, or use multiple cameras to capture entry points like first-floor windows through which someone may attempt to enter.

Common areas, hallways, and stairs

Your home’s pathways lead to the bedrooms, closets, and common rooms. Monitoring hallways and stairs gives you a wider range of video, particularly if any or all of those rooms contain valuables like jewelry, electronics, and firearms.

Basements

Ground-level windows or doors are easy entry points into your home. Protect that state-of-the-art man cave, climate-controlled wine cellar, or your personal safe with indoor security cameras that monitor your basement area’s windows and staircase.

Garage

Garages and sheds are treasure troves for thieves looking to make a quick buck by reselling items. Pressure washers, lawnmowers, and expensive hand tools are all appealing targets for a thief. An indoor camera placed here also lets you know whether you’ve unintentionally left your garage door ajar.

Outdoor security camera placement

Sunlight, temperature, and water damage aren’t issues with indoor cameras, but you need to consider them when deciding where to place outdoor security cameras. Work with your senior security consultant to determine the best outside locations. Whether you mount a camera in a light fixture, under a low eave, or on a porch, here are a few key places to consider placing outdoor cameras:

Doors

Positioning security cameras near your front and back doors are common sense if you want to monitor residents and guests’ comings and goings. Don’t forget to include other entries, whether it’s a rarely used side door or that extra door on your garage.

Windows

First-floor windows are a common entry point due to their accessibility. Side windows just out of view of the street are especially appealing spots for someone to break in. In addition to contact sensors and glass break detectors, consider using an outdoor camera to monitor your home’s side windows. If your home has a basement, make sure to cover any ground-level windows, too.

Driveway

We’ve all seen the surveillance footage of thieves parking in a homeowner’s driveway and loading up their car with goods … or breaking into a vehicle parked in the driveway. Should you have a security breach, a good outdoor security camera can help authorities identify the culprits.

Backyard

Mounting a wide-lens security camera on your back deck or porch can help cover anyone entering your backyard, attempting to access a shed, or approaching your back door.

Hidden vs. visible security cameras

So you want to monitor the exterior of your home, but you don’t want people to know they’re on camera? There’s an easy solution for that — hidden outdoor security cameras. Sure, leaving a home security camera out in the open can immediately grab the attention of and deter unwanted guests, but concealing a camera reduces the odds of a burglar tampering with your device.

Prime hiding techniques include sticking your camera in a birdhouse, concealing a camera in a fake rock, or disguising it with camouflage skins to naturally blend into its outdoor environment. However, some hiding spots can block your camera’s field of vision or damage the camera itself.

Where not to place a security camera

There are areas both in and around your home that demand a modicum of privacy. When placing indoor and outdoor security cameras, check local, state, and federal laws regarding camera usage. For instance, did you know that many surveillance cameras lack audio because it’s illegal to record conversations? Here are a few places where you shouldn’t use home security cameras:

Bedrooms and Bathrooms

Hallways and stairs? Yes. Bedrooms, bathrooms, and other places that violate the privacy of residents and guests? No. Your home should be a sanctuary, and those invited in expect privacy. You also could risk legal action if a guest is unaware of recording devices in a bedroom or bathroom.

Under and near tree branches

It makes sense to install security cameras on a tree, right? After all, most trees are tall enough to permit a wide range of views to take in activity around the house. However, trees also have branches with leaves. Foliage can get in the way of your camera’s field of view, making it difficult to distinguish faces and objects.

Places that are too high … or too low

Cameras installed over 10 feet high do a poor job of recording faces, and cameras installed lower than eight feet could be within reach of the wrong people. Outdoor security cameras installed too high or too low also won’t provide clear visuals of movement in and around your home.

Places that violate your neighbors’ privacy

Even if you have cameras recording every angle of your home, keep in mind your neighbors’ privacy expectations. Your video doorbell can capture a broad-angle view of the front of your home that picks up a broad background view of your neighbor’s home across the street. But cameras that aim directly into a nearby side neighbor’s house are a no-no. Be a good neighbor, and work with your senior security consultant to properly place your cameras.

Home security cameras in and around your home offer a great line of first defense. Pair them with a comprehensive security system and 24/7 professional monitoring to provide your family and property with even greater security and peace of mind. Learn more about Brinks Home Security® state-of-the-art systems.

Jason Stevens is a senior writer for Brinks Home Security. He is a "tech guy" who enjoys sharing home security and automation tips with others.

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Home Security Cameras

Where to place them.

BY JASON STEVENS

November 5, 2020

When it comes to creating a whole-home security system, security camera placement is crucial. But before installation, you will want to plan for a full-coverage approach that covers all entry points into your home, a variety of angles, and heights.

Use this home security camera placement guide to ensure the best coverage for your home and property.

Plan with a home security camera placement diagram

Keep in mind that although security cameras are a powerful tool in your home security arsenal, they are simply one piece of your security strategy. When planning, work with your senior security consultant to create a diagram of your home. Make sure you consider the following:

What the cameras cover

  • All points of entry

  • Hallways and pathways

  • Outdoor spaces

Property size

A property is safest when it is properly equipped to deal with every important angle. When you create your home’s security diagram, look for any areas that aren’t covered.

Power sources for your security cameras

Are your indoor and outdoor security cameras going to be installed in an area where a power source is local? Is internal power necessary? If your cameras have batteries, can you easily access those cameras to change out batteries as needed? While power source proximity is crucial, make sure you’re also ensuring the best view.

Camera sensor and video quality

It’s important to consider camera quality when choosing your home security solution. Look for options with infrared sensors, night vision, and high-definition video capabilities.

Indoor security camera placement

While you might envision burglars using stealthy means to access a home, statistics show many break-ins occur through the front door. A camera right inside your front entry or living room is your first line of defense when it comes to protection. Here are a few other areas to place indoor security cameras:

Inside front and back doors

Given these are commonly used entry points, angle your cameras to catch anyone entering or exiting through these main areas. Ensure the camera has a wide angle, or use multiple cameras to capture entry points like first-floor windows through which someone may attempt to enter.

Common areas, hallways, and stairs

Your home’s pathways lead to the bedrooms, closets, and common rooms. Monitoring hallways and stairs gives you a wider range of video, particularly if any or all of those rooms contain valuables like jewelry, electronics, and firearms.

Basements

Ground-level windows or doors are easy entry points into your home. Protect that state-of-the-art man cave, climate-controlled wine cellar, or your personal safe with indoor security cameras that monitor your basement area’s windows and staircase.

Garage

Garages and sheds are treasure troves for thieves looking to make a quick buck by reselling items. Pressure washers, lawnmowers, and expensive hand tools are all appealing targets for a thief. An indoor camera placed here also lets you know whether you’ve unintentionally left your garage door ajar.

Outdoor security camera placement

Sunlight, temperature, and water damage aren’t issues with indoor cameras, but you need to consider them when deciding where to place outdoor security cameras. Work with your senior security consultant to determine the best outside locations. Whether you mount a camera in a light fixture, under a low eave, or on a porch, here are a few key places to consider placing outdoor cameras:

Doors

Positioning security cameras near your front and back doors are common sense if you want to monitor residents and guests’ comings and goings. Don’t forget to include other entries, whether it’s a rarely used side door or that extra door on your garage.

Windows

First-floor windows are a common entry point due to their accessibility. Side windows just out of view of the street are especially appealing spots for someone to break in. In addition to contact sensors and glass break detectors, consider using an outdoor camera to monitor your home’s side windows. If your home has a basement, make sure to cover any ground-level windows, too.

Driveway

We’ve all seen the surveillance footage of thieves parking in a homeowner’s driveway and loading up their car with goods … or breaking into a vehicle parked in the driveway. Should you have a security breach, a good outdoor security camera can help authorities identify the culprits.

Backyard

Mounting a wide-lens security camera on your back deck or porch can help cover anyone entering your backyard, attempting to access a shed, or approaching your back door.

Hidden vs. visible security cameras

So you want to monitor the exterior of your home, but you don’t want people to know they’re on camera? There’s an easy solution for that — hidden outdoor security cameras. Sure, leaving a home security camera out in the open can immediately grab the attention of and deter unwanted guests, but concealing a camera reduces the odds of a burglar tampering with your device.

Prime hiding techniques include sticking your camera in a birdhouse, concealing a camera in a fake rock, or disguising it with camouflage skins to naturally blend into its outdoor environment. However, some hiding spots can block your camera’s field of vision or damage the camera itself.

Where not to place a security camera

There are areas both in and around your home that demand a modicum of privacy. When placing indoor and outdoor security cameras, check local, state, and federal laws regarding camera usage. For instance, did you know that many surveillance cameras lack audio because it’s illegal to record conversations? Here are a few places where you shouldn’t use home security cameras:

Bedrooms and Bathrooms

Hallways and stairs? Yes. Bedrooms, bathrooms, and other places that violate the privacy of residents and guests? No. Your home should be a sanctuary, and those invited in expect privacy. You also could risk legal action if a guest is unaware of recording devices in a bedroom or bathroom.

Under and near tree branches

It makes sense to install security cameras on a tree, right? After all, most trees are tall enough to permit a wide range of views to take in activity around the house. However, trees also have branches with leaves. Foliage can get in the way of your camera’s field of view, making it difficult to distinguish faces and objects.

Places that are too high … or too low

Cameras installed over 10 feet high do a poor job of recording faces, and cameras installed lower than eight feet could be within reach of the wrong people. Outdoor security cameras installed too high or too low also won’t provide clear visuals of movement in and around your home.

Places that violate your neighbors’ privacy

Even if you have cameras recording every angle of your home, keep in mind your neighbors’ privacy expectations. Your video doorbell can capture a broad-angle view of the front of your home that picks up a broad background view of your neighbor’s home across the street. But cameras that aim directly into a nearby side neighbor’s house are a no-no. Be a good neighbor, and work with your senior security consultant to properly place your cameras.

Home security cameras in and around your home offer a great line of first defense. Pair them with a comprehensive security system and 24/7 professional monitoring to provide your family and property with even greater security and peace of mind. Learn more about Brinks Home Security® state-of-the-art systems.

Jason Stevens is a senior writer for Brinks Home Security. He is a "tech guy" who enjoys sharing home security and automation tips with others.

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